A Sudden Stop

But there is something, in the Jewish Sabbath that is absent from most Christian Sundays:  a true cessation from the rhythms of work and world, a time wholly set apart, and, perhaps above all, a sense that the point of Shabbat, the orientation of Shabbat, is toward God. ~ Laurie Winner, Mudhouse Sabbath: An Invitation to a Life of Spiritual Disciplines

After reading Buchanan’s thoughts on Sabbath and the comparison between the Exodus and Deuteronomy commands, I found Winner’s book, Mudhouse Sabbath, and bought it for my Kindle.   As much as Buchanan challenged my mind, Winner spoke to my spirit, to that deep place in me that knew somehow our Sunday rituals of eating out and taking naps are not the true spirit of Sabbath-keeping.

As a convert from Judaism to Christianity, she has great insight into these practices of the Jewish faith and how deeply the simple act of practicing Sabbath, Shabbat, transforms the thinking and attitude of the one who is doing so.

I read her description of rushing about on Friday afternoon to fix all the food necessary for the next 25 hours – frantic shopping, chopping, and cooking.  The madness of preparation … and then lighting a candle to indicate the Sabbath has begun.   All that frenzy immediately stopped by a single flame.

Have you ever gazed into a candle’s flame?   There is something almost mystical about the flickering, the way even a small movement can alter the course of the flame.   A calming yet fascinating light.

Perhaps we’ve so immersed ourselves in the frenzy of preparing to rest that we’ve missed the truth that rest is almost always a sudden stop, a conscious choice to change our focus to the flame, to the light.

Maybe, just maybe, we need that sudden stop … that full cessation of all activity … in order to understand Sabbath, true rest.     We need to be reoriented toward God and that is impossible to do when we continue to orient ourselves toward the speed of life.

Perhaps slowing begins with a sudden stop.

What are your thoughts on Sabbath-keeping?  How does the idea of lighting that candle to mark the beginning of Sabbath speak to you?

11 Replies to “A Sudden Stop”

  1. Great thoughts, Teri Lynne! Thanks so much for sharing.

  2. Perhaps slowing begins with a sudden stop. – profound thought to ponder. I get so busy getting read I don’t rest and when you wrote about afternoon naps – that really resonated with me. wow I feel God’s tug to contemplate this with you. thank you for igniting my flame – my candle of leading to Sabbath.

  3. Teri Lynne, thank you so much for this post. I found much to consider and pray about in it, and a desire to find more rest and making sure to slow down by just stopping! Bright blessings, Shanyn, Strawberry Roan

  4. […] when I shared that rest is often a sudden stop?   Today, I’m embracing that truth.  Yes, there are still boxes to unpack and laundry to do […]

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  6. I read Mudhouse Sabbath last fall – SO good! I need to re-read it!

    1. Teri Lynne Underwood says: Reply

      I loved it!! It’s definitely one of those I know I’ll read again.

  7. […] this Tuesday before Easter, you – like me – need a sudden stop, a reality check. Because what does it matter if we gain the world but lose our […]

  8. […] A Sudden Stop … Perhaps we’ve so immersed ourselves in the frenzy of preparing to rest that we’ve missed the truth that rest is almost always a sudden stop, a conscious choice to change our focus to the flame, to the light. […]

  9. […] this Tuesday before Easter, you – like me – need a sudden stop, a reality check. Because what does it matter if we gain the world but lose our […]

  10. […] Candles burning, a reminder to slow […]

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